News | The Huntington and Langham Estate | Hindhead, Farnham, Liphook, Haslemere, Godalming, Petersfield, Grayshott, Hindhead

Latest News

Respite-care-and-day-care
11th July

What's the difference between respite care and day care?

Whilst caregiving can be rewarding, it can also be extremely demanding – both physically and mentally. When a loved one becomes ill, it’s almost by instinct that we want to take care of them – but in doing so, it can be all too easy to forget about our own health and wellbeing, particularly if this is juggled alongside a full-time job and looking after children. Taking time out to look after yourself, as a carer, is important for your caregiving responsibilities, since being exhausted can prevent you from providing the best care possible.

 

Respite and day care options can be ideal for those who both provide and require at-home care, giving the carer a much needed break and their loved one opportunities to interact with others whilst receiving support.

 

Respite care

Respite care options are ideal for carers who are looking to take a short break away from their day-to-day responsibilities. Available for 1-4 weeks at a time, respite care at Huntington House and Langham Court offers full-time care to those who need it, allowing their carers to take some time out. Whether you’ve planned a holiday or you’re needed elsewhere at short notice, respite care offers help in both emergency and pre-planned situations.

 

At The Huntington and Langham Estate, we realise the importance of carers dedicating some time to boosting their own physical and mental health. Carers can relax in the knowledge that their loved ones are looked after in their absence, as they’re offered an exciting selection of activities, freshly cooked meals with locally sourced ingredients and beautiful gardens. We encourage all of our residents – no matter their length of stay – to get involved and make new friends, whilst being as independent as possible.

 

Day care

Similarly to respite care, day care is usually given as an opportunity for at-home carers to take some time out for themselves – a day at a time, rather than a whole week or more. At Langham Court, we open our day care doors twice per week, welcoming people from all walks of life who need extra support with daily routines. Our day care service provides visitors with opportunities to meet new people, a nutritious three course meal, refreshments and homemade cakes. We like our visitors to feel part of a community, no matter their length of stay.

 

Although caring for a loved one is an important responsibility to take on, you should never feel that it has to consume your whole life, or feel guilty for taking time out. Your health and wellbeing, as a carer, is equally as important. To speak to a member of our team about our care options, please click here.

Keep reading
Young and old play
14th February

Here at the Huntington & Langham Estate, age really is just a number

Many people think that care homes are just for the older generation – but they couldn’t be further from the truth. In fact, if you tried to work out the average age of people who walk through our doors, you’ll probably find that it’s around 30! Let us explain…

Here at the Huntington & Langham Estate, we’re here to provide expert care for those in need of a helping hand in our homes. But one other key thing that we focus on is community. That includes sponsoring local events, supporting local businesses and building great relationships with local schools.

That’s why you’ll quite often see local children laughing, learning and playing here in our homes, and we love seeing our residents thrive when spending time with the youngest generation. Our links with local schools bring so many benefits to the people who live here, and we believe this quality time is a key part of our residents being able to lead truly fulfilling lives. In our eyes, it’s something every care home should consider if they’re not already.

We are lucky enough to have great links with fabulous schools. The children come in every week and fill the home with much laughter, along with a unique energy, spirit and openness that’s so refreshing. They don’t see wheelchairs, they don’t see dementia and they don’t see age – they simply experience fun, connections, friendships and cake!

We have had a strong relationship with St. Edmund’s School in Hindhead for over 30 years and over the past 18 months or so, we have been lucky enough to host their reception classes here in our home. Every week in term time, the school’s reception pupils come along to learn, and our residents love having them here. The class alternates between our two homes, and the children usually spend time singing, chatting with our residents, reading books and getting stuck in with arts and crafts, and we also have all sorts of fun things like dressing-up boxes and games. The teachers bring in everything needed to hold each class here, but mostly, it’s about letting the children completely be themselves in the company of our residents.

This is what Karen Bailey, Head of Early Years at St. Edmund’s School, has to say about holding classes here in our home: “The relationship between the two generations is something truly special that just happens naturally. Our visits link young and old through play, giving us a greater understanding and appreciation of another generation that we may not otherwise have regular contact with. The children cannot wait to see their friends every week.”

More recently, we have welcomed the children from PK Preschool. They visit us once a month with their parents to sing, draw, read and play games. The interaction is a delight to see and most importantly, the experience is beneficial to both young and old.

If you are connected to a local school or nursery in the Grayshott area and would like to get involved, we’re always keen to build new relationships; we believe this quality time here in our home is just as beneficial for children as it is for the people who live here, so why not get in touch? There’s nothing quite like seeing these two generations come together and it really does show that age is just a number.

Keep reading
The MD's musings
Blindfolded role play
1st February

Seeing the world of care through new eyes

Blindfolded role play. Perhaps not the first thing you'd associate with a care home. But it's something that happens quite regularly here at the Huntington & Langham Estate.

A lot of our training for staff focuses on empathy, and when asked what empathy means to them, the answer is often "putting yourself in someone else's shoes".

This is great in principle, but not so easy in practice given that our team members have never lived in a care home, permanently lost their independence or been at the end of their life.

Role play can temporarily immerse you into a life unknown. It can create unexpected feelings and highlight aspects of life we didn't realise we took for granted.

I once went to a 'Dining in the Dark' restaurant and spat out a perfectly edible salad leaf covered in dressing as it felt like I'd put a slug in my mouth. I felt an unexpected vulnerability - my mind went into a state of panic with each mouthful after that salad leaf.

The main benefit of role play is that it takes you out of your comfort zone and into a place where it's so easy to feel as though you're no longer in control. Whether it's being assisted to eat, walk, dress, wash, or whatever, being the other side of the care helps staff to realise how fine the line is between enabling and disabling.

Is there too much food on the fork? Am I giving the next mouthful too soon? Have I explained what it is? If you're helping someone to eat and not asking yourself these questions then I'd suggest it's time to don the blindfold.

Charlie

Keep reading

Archives