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20th November

Another award recognising Langham’s exceptional care

Remember, remember the 8th November…as that’s the night when the high-profile Gala night for the National Dementia Care Awards was held at the Hilton Brighton Metropole, hosted by Labour politician, Hazel Blears.

Over 450 guests were in attendance, and we’re proud to say that one of our own was in attendance as she had been nominated for an award – Maggie Cain. For those of you who know Maggie, this will come as no surprise! And for those of you who don’t, you’re more than welcome to visit us at Langham Court anytime and see the positive impact Maggie has on our residents’ lives.

We’re delighted to say that on the night, Maggie was presented with the award for Dementia Care Inspiring Leader 2018, which is an absolutely incredible achievement! This is what the two judges had to say: “Maggie has such a big heart and huge compassion. She inspires the staff by simply being herself – she is a lovely human being. Maggie’s greatest joy is seeing others blossom in a culture of kindness, love and respect…family.”

A bit about the awards

Once a year, the National Dementia Care Awards are held, organised by the Journal of Dementia Care, which is a multidisciplinary journal for all professional staff working with people who are living with dementia. This includes those working in hospitals, nursing and residential care homes, day units and the community.

Created to recognise the very best individuals working within the dementia care sector, the awards are highly coveted, identifying those people whose exceptional work and contributions make better, person-centred care a reality. This year, there were 16 categories, with four or five finalists within each of those categories, and two independent judges carefully choosing the winners.

Maggie’s great achievement

Maggie was nominated for the Dementia Care Inspiring Leader 2018 award by Julie Drake, who is the manager here at Langham Court, and notably the 2017/8 National Dementia Manager of the Year.

In Julie’s words, “Maggie is an inspiration to the whole Langham Court care team. She has the gift of befriending everyone she meets and is a cornerstone of the success of Langham Court. Maggie has been one of the team for over five years and continually works to enrich of the lives of the people living at Langham Court and those of their families.”

As her name was announced at the Gala as the winner, Maggie was completely overwhelmed, mentioning in her acceptance speech how she felt extremely humbled, thanking her wonderful team for their backing. Maggie admitted that she is not very good at self-promotion, preferring to spend her time quietly working behind the scenes and making sure that everyone who lives and works at Langham Court always feel like they are ‘at home’. Maggie’s commitment, energy and passion truly reflect the home’s ethos and we couldn’t be prouder of what she has achieved.

To experience Langham Court for yourself, please do get in touch – we would love to hear from you and are always happy to help.

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15th November

The Huntington & Langham Christmas Box Project

Here at the Huntington & Langham Estate, we’re taking part in this year’s Christmas Box Project to help those less fortunate than ourselves. It’s a community project that has been set up to help elderly residents in our towns and villages who live alone, as they may not receive any other presents this Christmas, and a box of goodies from us will give them something nice to unwrap.

It’s a nice gesture to make sure everyone has something this Christmas. It’s also a wonderful project for those attending our day centre to focus on, and it has been great seeing them all work together to make, fill and wrap the many boxes we have put together.

Who’s involved in the project?

The readers of the local Messenger group of newspapers fill shoeboxes with lots of lovely Christmas-themed items, then the boxes are delivered across the area in conjunction with local Age Concern groups, church projects, Petersfield Salvation Army, local hospitals, nursing homes and to individual people in the community who we believe live alone.

It really is a fantastic project to help local people; now in its fourth year, it comes back bigger and better each time. Last year, with the help of readers and local businesses, over 1,000 boxes were gifted to the elderly residents of our town and beyond.

What’s in the H&L boxes?

Inside each of the boxes we’ve been making, filling and wrapping here at the Huntington & Langham Estate, we have included a personal invitation to two free concerts being held right here in early 2019. We have also included a handmade Christmas decoration in each box, together with some delicious edible items, such as biscuits and other sweet treats, crackers and custard, soup and steamed sponge puddings! Hopefully our boxes will put smiles on the faces of those who receive them – and we really look forward to seeing each of them in the new year for our concerts.

If you would like to get involved in our day centre’s antics, please do get in touch by calling 01428 606 143 or by emailing us at langham@hlestate.co.uk – we would love to see you here at our Day Centre sometime.

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25th October

In our home, we offer a pioneering alternative to traditional care home life

Before Langham Court opened in 2013, we spent a lot of time researching which model of care to follow, and one approach stood out above the rest. This was the ‘Butterfly’ model, which we saw as the most intuitive approach. It reflected our family ethos here at the Huntington & Langham Estate too, so we decided to follow it from day one.

At the time, there were only a handful of ‘Butterfly’ homes, but now with more homes on board and to positive impact of this model of care so clear to see, we’re so pleased we made the decision back in 2013 – the impact it has on our residents’ lives is evident. We’re proud to be part of the top 1% of UK care homes, with a CQC rating of ‘Outstanding’, but things are about to get even better.

We’re delighted to announce that here at the Huntington & Langham Estate, we’re pioneering a brand-new model of care in both our homes on behalf of Dementia Care Matters, who developed the ‘Butterfly’ model. We’re piloting this new, ground-breaking project to challenge the traditional nursing home model that exists in most care homes across the UK by breaking down barriers that often exist between staff and residents and doing away with service-led routines and language.

Where did the model come from?

For over 20 years, the team at Dementia Care Matters have been paving the way for modern dementia care with their ‘Feelings Matter Most’ approach. Dr David Sheard, who founded it all, said: “We applaud Huntington House for being pioneers. Implementing the best ideas from Butterfly Homes across the whole care sector is the next transformation needed in the UK. All Care Matters.”

This unique model is a huge success in Canada already, and has appeared on front pages of newspapers and on national TV. What emerged from the success of the Butterfly Model was how obvious it was that its core values aren’t just relevant to dementia care, but all care. That’s why, with a potentially revolutionary impact on the care industry, Dr Sheard is adapting the original Butterfly Model to do just that.

Dr Sheard commented, “Feelings Matter Most in life whether you have dementia or not. Emotional care should be at the heart of all care. Butterfly Homes have proven quality of life in dementia care is a basic human right. The mission of Dementia Care Matters is to be a disruptor of all poor care. The essence of great dementia care can now be a model of care for everyone. Culture change across a whole care home enables everyone to flourish.”

Dementia Care Matters at the Huntington & Langham Estate

We have seen first-hand on our Estate how the Dementia Care Matters model works, and we have even won awards for it. Julie Drake, our dedicated Home Manager, won the Best Manager Award at the National Dementia Care Awards 2018 for all that she has done here. We are also finalists at the 2018 National Dementia Care Awards for Best Activities. And it’s all thanks to how we have changed our approach by following Dr Sheard’s advice. You really can see the difference in our residents’ lives, and that’s what it’s all about. We’re so pleased that this approach can now be adopted in Huntington as well as Langham.

A bit more about the ‘All Care Matters’ model

The ‘All Care Matters’ model essentially aims to truly put the ‘home’ into nursing homes and give the people who live in them a voice. When the residents were consulted about their feelings towards taking part in this pioneering project, one person said: “You’re not going to change the marmalade, are you?” Charlie replied, “You will be able to have whatever marmalade you would like.”

While the topic of marmalade may seem trivial to some, the ‘All Care Matters’ model appreciates that the little things in life are important and are a huge factor in making a place feel like home. While one person might have thick-cut marmalade, another might have thin, and someone else might choose to make their own. There’s no ‘one-size-fits-all’, and in the extreme, each person might have a completely personalised menu for each meal that reminds them of their cherished childhood memories.

What we hope to achieve

Much of the stigma attached to nursing homes is fear of losing that all-important independence and having decisions made for you. As a minimum, the ‘All Care Matters’ model will enable residents to be more independent again by re-engaging people in their own decision-making. As a maximum, it could mean an even more fulfilling life for those living in a nursing home than living in their own homes! To find out more, please do come and see us here at the Huntington & Langham Estate, where we can show you around and answer any questions you may have about All Care Matters and how it has the power to transform residents’ lives.

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17th August

'Ponies inspiring people' – opening minds and healing hearts

You’ll probably know already if you’ve visited us, but we’re big on animals here at the Huntington & Langham Estate. In fact, it used to be home to a feisty and independent pony named Braveheart. Braveheart came from the Dartmoor Pony Heritage Trust, and when he was here on the Estate in Surrey, he clearly missed his home in Dartmoor.

Braveheart didn’t settle very well, and he tried to escape a few times, eventually managing to break through fencing. The difficult decision was finally made to take Braveheart back to the DPHT, where initially his future was unknown – a rather grumpy pony doesn’t tend to make many friends! However, Dru from DPHT and her team never gave up on Braveheart, and he is now the leader of the pack when it comes to working with young people at the organisation.

The DPHT has built a strong reputation for courses for young people with challenging behaviour and disabilities, with Dartmoor ponies the stars of the show. Their aim is to create opportunities for young people to meet their full potential by providing them with a set of social and emotional skills that will allow them to participate more effectively in everyday life – this could potentially help them to move into long-term employment. At the DPHT, they offer a flexible range of proven courses for students facing challenges such as anger management, lack of self-esteem and confidence, attention and behaviour deficits, disaffection and personal development.

It may seem like an unusual approach but forming a relationship with a pony actually helps young people to build trust ad also develop a bond of mutual empathy, as well as learning to face their fears and develop respect and compassion. Additionally, communication skills, self-confidence, coping techniques and self-esteem improve at the same time, which are vital for dealing with many aspects of everyday life.

Testimonial: “The work by Dru and DPHT is most likened to ‘Equine Facilitated Learning’ (EFL), an intervention that utilises horses to teach people about themselves in the hope of bringing about positive change via the learning of skills, although the inclusion of wild Dartmoor ponies offers a variation to the normal protocol. Participants seem to form a bond with both Dru and the ponies, which allows them to receive constructive feedback in a non-threatening, non-judgmental way so that the participants can come to know themselves better and witness how their actions can have consequences. Skills learnt are said to include teamwork and social skills, trust and motivation, which in turn contribute to the building of self-esteem whilst improving empathy, effective ways of managing feelings and developing greater self-awareness, all important social and emotional skills.” Dawn Chaplin and Katy Hurworth – Final Year BSc (Hons) Psychology Undergraduates, Plymouth University